Smoked Haddock Kedgeree – A Great British Classic Recipe for British Food Fortnight

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As a country we are lucky to have so many culinary influences, down I guess in no small part to having been a trading and seafaring nation with ships and merchants travelling across the globe and openly accepting many different peoples and cultures into our own. Today in any major town and city you can eat authentically cooked food from around the world in fine dining restaurants, family-owned corner cafes and from street vendors and pop-ups. Now one of the most influential of all these cuisines would be Indian and spices, curries, and chutneys now play a major part in our cooking and dining habits from the mildest Butter Chicken to the hottest Phall, an Anglo-India mix of tomatoes, ginger and Scotch Bonnet peppers. Supermarket shelves are full of pastes, sauces, pickles and poppadums and fridges full of every type of curry imaginable, and you are never far from an Indian* restaurant.

There is an Indian influence to kedgeree, but it is a particularly British interpretation. Kedgeree is thought to have originated with the British colonial servants returning to Britain after working in India. It was traditionally served at breakfast and is still popular in grand hotels and gentlemen’s clubs. The classic kedgeree is made from curried rice with flaked fish and perhaps some sultanas and quartered hard-boiled eggs. I like to serve my kedgeree with soft boiled eggs, a sprinkling of flaked almonds, maybe you could throw in a few prawns ( entirely my own corruption ) and a jug of fruity curry sauce and yes, I do eat it for breakfast and for lunch too as it makes for a wonderful brunch.

*Often of Bangladeshi origin

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree with soft boiled egg

Smoked Haddock Kedgeree

For the kedgeree

400 gr naturally Smoked Haddock Fillet

300 gr easy-cook long grain Rice, rinsed under running water

600 ml quality Fish Stock

Approximately 300 ml full-fat Milk

4 large free-range Eggs, at room temperature

3 medium Onions, peeled

A small handful of frozen Garden Peas, defrosted

A small handful of flaked Almonds

A small handful of Parsley, washed and finely chopped

A small handful of Coriander, washed and finely chopped

4 tablespoons of Butter

2 tablespoons Vegetable Oil

1 tablespoon Medium Curry Powder

1 teaspoon ground Coriander

1 teaspoon ground Turmeric

1 Clove of Garlic, peeled and very finely crushed

2 Bay Leaves

2 Cloves

Sea Salt and freshly ground White Pepper

For the Fruity curry sauce

1 small Onion, peeled and very finely chopped

1 small tin of Pineapple Rings, drained and roughly chopped

1 large Cooking Apple, peeled and diced

1 small handful of Sultanas

100 ml quality Chicken stock ( or vegetable stock )

100 ml Coconut Milk

2 tablespoons Mango Chutney

2 tablespoon medium Curry Powder

Zest and freshly squeezed juice of a Lime

A pinch of Chilli flakes

Sea Salt and freshly ground White Pepper

First to prepare the curried rice finely chop two of the onions and heat half of the oil and two tablespoons of the butter in a medium-sized heavy-bottomed pan, add the onions then over a moderate heat cook for twenty to thirty minutes until soft. Add the garlic and spices and half a teaspoon of salt and continue to cook, stirring continuously for a couple of minutes. Add the rice and stock and bring up to a gentle boil. Cover the pan and simmer for ten minutes. Remove from the heat and without removing the lid leave to finish cooking for a further fifteen minutes.

While the rice is steaming in the pan, place the smoked haddock into a small heavy-bottomed pan and cover with milk. Halve the remaining onion and stick the bay leaves to the onions halves with the cloves to make a cloute. Add these to the pan containing the smoked haddock. Place on a low heat and bring up to the lowest possible simmer and poach for ten minutes. Remove the fish from the milk and allow to cool. The milk can be reserved to make chowder. When the fish is cool flake into thumbnail sized pieces and put to one side.

Place a pan of water on to boil and once simmering add the eggs placing them in with a spoon. Start your timer and simmer for six minutes. Remove from the heat and immediately plunge the eggs into iced cold water. When cool you can peel the eggs and set to one side. To serve the kedgeree add the remaining oil and butter to a sauté pan and over a medium heat cook the peas for two minutes then add the fish, rice and flaked almonds. Stirring constantly fry the mix until it is thoroughly warmed through, then season and stir in the chopped parsley and coriander. Cut the boiled eggs in half and serve them on top of the plated rice with some crispy fried shallots and a jug of sweet curry sauce.

For the sweet curry sauce, melt half the butter in a medium-sized heavy-bottom saucepan and add the onion, pineapple, and apple. Sauté carefully for ten minutes to start to soften the onion. Add the curry powder, chilli flakes, sultanas, coconut milk, and stock and bring to the boil and gently simmer for twenty minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the mango chutney and allow to cool for a few minutes. Then puree in a food processor and pass through a sieve to form a smooth glossy sauce. Return to a pan and add the lime zest and juice, season and gently reheat stirring frequently. Because of the high sugar content, the sauce will easily catch and burn so heat very gently.

Allergens in this recipe are;

  Flour  Raw Fish Milk  Crab

Please see the Allergens Page

 

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